Train Simulator

Famous, Fast, Historic!

Written by: Gary Dolzall.
The Northeast Corridor: Washington DC – Baltimore route is now available for Train Simulator!
Famous, fast... and historic. Those are three words that easily come to mind when describing Amtrak’s remarkable Northeast Corridor. And now, the always-busy southern portion of the “NEC” – from Baltimore, Maryland, to America’s capital city – is available for Train Simulator!
In its earliest form, what is today the southern portion of the Northeast Corridor dates to the 1870s and was the work of the Baltimore & Potomac Railroad. The Baltimore & Potomac constructed its 7,600-foot-long “B&P” tunnel leading south from Baltimore and placed its original passenger station in Washington, DC, at a location that is today part of the National Mall. The B&P was first controlled by, then merged into, the Pennsylvania Railroad, and it was the great Pennsy, along with the Washington Terminal Company, that largely shaped what would become the southern end of the NEC.
Magnificent Washington Union Station was opened in 1907, classic Baltimore Penn Station followed in 1911, and it was with the PRR’s pioneering electrification project of 1932-33 that the corridor first achieved its status as arguably the most dynamic stretch of railroad in the entire United States. In May 1971, Amtrak assumed intercity passenger operations on the Northeast Corridor and later that decade became owner of the route between Washington and New York.
With today’s bustling Northeast Corridor hosting Acela high-speed trains and regional and long-distance services, Washington is, of course, a vital operating hub for Amtrak. Located near Washington Union Station is historic K Tower, which opened in 1907 and today continues to govern movements in and out of the station. Farther north of the station can be found the Amtrak coach yards and famed Ivy City, which is home to Amtrak’s Ivy City Maintenance Center and Alstom Transportation facilities which together provide state-of-the-art support to Amtrak’s high-speed train equipment.
Between Washington and Baltimore, the Corridor hosts two Amtrak stations: New Carrolton, Maryland, and the BWI Marshall Airport station adjacent to Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. The line is primarily triple track, with two-track sections north out of Washington and approaching Baltimore as well as a short four-track main north of Halethorpe. And, of course, the route is high-speed territory, with track speeds of up to 125 mph.
The Northeast Corridor also serves as the Penn Line of commuter carrier Maryland Area Regional Commuter (MARC), which operates additional stations at Seabrook, Bowie State, Odenton, Halethorpe, and West Baltimore.
The new Train Simulator Northeast Corridor: Washington DC – Baltimore route extends from Washington, DC, 41 route miles north to Baltimore, where iconic Baltimore Penn Station rests near the north portal of the B&P Tunnel. Along with a masterful re-creation of the busy line, this new Train Simulator route includes a selection of realistic locomotives and equipment, including the Siemens ACS-64 and Amfleet I and Amfleet II passenger equipment, the stylish and fast Acela train sets, and passenger equipment suitable for Amtrak’s long-distance trains. For AI commuter services, an unbranded MPI MP36PH-3C and Bombardier MultiLevel equipment are included. And the route features a full selection of career and railfan scenarios.
It’s time to climb aboard Amtrak’s high-speed Acela and flashy ACS-64 speedster to experience famous, fast, and historic American passenger railroading, with the Northeast Corridor: Washington DC – Baltimore route. – Gary Dolzall
Northeast Corridor: Washington DC – Baltimore is included in Train Simulator 2022 coming September 30!
Available now, the Northeast Corridor: Washington DC – Baltimore route for Train Simulator extends 41 route miles from Washington Union Station to Baltimore Penn Station. An Acela is making its way north out of Washington Union Station and passes historic K Tower (above), while at Baltimore Penn Station an ACS-64-powered Northeast Regional train and an Acela board passengers side by side (below). Screenshots by Gary Dolzall.
The environs around Washington Union Station are a constant beehive of railroading. Amtrak ACS-64 605 is standing in the night next to the venerable 1907-built K Tower (above), while a short distance farther north on a sunny day, Acela 2009 sweeps past a sister near the Amtrak coach yards (below). Note: Screenshots may depict content while in development.
Between Washington and Baltimore, the Corridor hosts two intermediate Amtrak stations: New Carrolton, Maryland (above), and the BWI Marshall Airport station adjacent to Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (below). Many of Amtrak’s regional services call at each station, while Acela trains frequently stop at BWI.
Between Washington, DC, and Baltimore, the Northeast Corridor is primarily triple track, with two-track sections north out of Washington and approaching Baltimore as well as a short four-track main north of Halethorpe. The route is, of course, high-speed territory with track speeds of up to 125 mph, and the line often passes through scenic country. Am Amfleet-equipped, ACS-64-powered southbound glides high above Gwynns Falls near West Baltimore.
The Northeast Corridor also serves as the Penn Line of commuter carrier Maryland Area Regional Commuter (MARC), which operates additional stations at Seabrook, Bowie State, Odenton, Halethorpe, and West Baltimore. A southbound Amtrak intercity train and northbound commuter service meet on the line’s triple-track main line (above), while on a snowy day an Acela streaks through the commuter station at Halethorpe, Maryland (below).
Having cleared the 7,600-foot B&P Tunnel, Amtrak ACS-64 644 and its Northeast Regional train leave Baltimore behind, bound for the nation’s capital. The Northeast Corridor: Washington DC – Baltimore route includes a selection of realistic locomotives and equipment, including the Siemens ACS-64 and Amfleet I and Amfleet II passenger equipment, the stylish Acela train sets, and passenger equipment suitable for Amtrak’s long-distance trains. For AI commuter services, an unbranded MPI MP36PH-3C and Bombardier MultiLevel equipment are included. And the route features a full selection of career and railfan scenarios.
It’s time to climb aboard Amtrak’s high-speed Acela and flashy ACS-64 speedster to experience famous, fast, and historic American passenger railroading, with the Northeast Corridor: Washington DC – Baltimore route for Train Simulator available now at the Steam and Dovetail Games Stores!
Screenshots and images displayed in this article may depict content that is still in development. The licensed brands may not have been approved by their respective owner and some artwork may still be pending approval.
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Train Simulator
22 Dec
Famous, Fast, Historic!
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